Fountain Pen Restoration

Christmas 2012

Happy Holidays and Merry Christmas from Fountain Pen Restoration.  This is my 6th Christmas Post.  After running out of Christmas Pens, I have looked for some unique advertisements the last two years.  Last year was a 1907 Wirt Christmas advertisement, and this year is a Waterman from the same year.  This advertisement has a lot to look at, being theatrically themed, as it appeared inside the front cover of Theater Magazine.  I am not an expert on early 20th Century theatre, but supposedly the persons depicted were recognizable to those that were.  

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My favorite section of the advertisement is below.  To those of us that enjoy vintage pens – this would be a visit from Santa we would not soon forget!

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Have a great Holiday Season and a Healthy New Year!

December 24, 2012 Posted by | Christmas, Christmas Pen | , | 1 Comment

Waterman 1st Generation Skywriter

Early in 2012, I spent time in three separate posts discussing two “generations” of the Waterman Skywriter.  What I called the 2nd Generation, produced in the late 1940s and early 1950s, was written about in these two linked posts:

Waterman Skywriter – March 1, 2012
Silver 1950s Waterman Skywriter – May 14, 2012

The 3rd Generation was produced after 1952 and appeared in this linked post:

Waterman 3rd Generation Skywriter – April 19, 2012

A comparative photo of these two versions is below ~

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In review~

Waterman Skywriters were produced by Waterman over quite a span of time.  They were first produced in Canada under the Waterman and Aiken Lambert name.  Waterman had purchased Aikin Lambert in the 30s and these first Skywriters used both names. See this link for excellent Skywriter information.  These were produced from sometime in the late 30s into the 1940s.

Interestingly, the name Skywriter was capitalizing on the rising popularity of air travel.  Other Pen Companies had also done this as evidenced by the Wahl Eversharp Skyline and the Sheaffer Skyboy. (follow links to previous posts on these pens).

I have been looking for a decent example of a “First Generation” Skywriter for quite some time, and recently was able to work out a deal for two examples. Below is a photo of the two pens after I took them apart.  The brown pen came as a set and I have included the mechanical pencil.

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This was an interesting restoration for a few reasons.  First, as you can see the brown Skywriter has no clip.  Secondly, what you cannot see is that the green Skywriter has a replacement Sheaffer nib.  After cleaning it, I discovered that it is a Sheaffer 33 nib, which fit perfectly into the section/feed.  I cleaned all of the components above – the worst being the brown cap.  It had many layers of dried ink.   I also replaced both size 16 sacs and cleaned out the sections, which are both visualated.  The resulting pens (and pencil) are below.  They measure 4 15/16 closed and 6 3/8 inches open.

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Though the same size, you can see the subtle differences in the designs.  The cap banding and barrel ends are different.  However, the levers, sections and feeds are the same.

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Here is a closeup of the Aikin Lambert (US) nib that was on the brown pen.  I replaced it onto the green pen, which is the more complete pen, having an appropriate clip.

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The Imprints of the two first generation Skywriters are identical, as you can see below.  What is interesting to me is that they were both made in the United States.  Much of what I have read of these pens is that they were produced around the time that Waterman purchased Aiken Lambert in the late 1930s.  Further, most information points to pens being produced in Canada.  Obviously, production was also occurring in the US, as these two pens point out.  I have seen many of these in similar stripe patterns as well as marble plastic patterns.

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From top to bottom – First, Second and Third Generation Skywriters.

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It seems to me that there are not too many pen models over the years that have endured this many drastic design and production changes.  Many have had various generational differences, but few this dramatic.  By the time the third generation occurred, the pen had changed into a CF clone, and production had moved across the Atlantic Ocean!

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As with the later Skywriters, little advertising exists for these Canadian and US pens.  Nonetheless, they are interesting collectibles, just like their younger versions.

December 3, 2012 Posted by | Waterman Pen Company, Waterman Skywriter | , , | 2 Comments

   

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