Fountain Pen Restoration

Waterman C/F Trade In Set

This is my second post about the Waterman C/F (Cartridge/Fill). The first was on April 7, 2011 – Waterman C/F .   This time, I restored a C/F Set.  This particular set includes a matching pencil, and I was fortunate to find an unused post card advertisement, showing a similar set.  It appears below, and was mailed out by The Typewriter Shop in Meriden, Connecticut, to promote their store, and this set.  Interestingly, they were offering a $5.00 credit toward the $20.00 set price, for any old fountain pens with a 14K gold point!

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The reverse of the postcard has this 2 cent stamp. Using this stamp as a guide, the postcard dates from 1952 to 1958.

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Below are the two instruments after taken apart.  The blue cartridge with red tip was taken from the section, which was filled with blue ink.

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Not much internal work needs to be done (other than rinsing in an ultrasonic cleaner) as this is a standard cartridge pen.  Below is the finished product ~ a pen measuring 5 3/16 inches closed and 6 1/16 inches posted.  The pencil measures 5 1/4 inches and takes 0.9 mm lead.

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The nibs and sections on these are notorious for chipping and losing their plating, but this one has survived unscathed.  I would estimated it to be a medium width.

The link in the first paragraph directs you to previously stated C/F information, and here is a small extract:

“The CF (Cartridge Fill) is intriguing purely from an historical perspective. It is thought of as the first modern widely produced and distributed cartridge pen. I also happen to think that it is pretty sharp looking and reflects the 1950s modern deco styles.

It comes as no surprise that the designer was Harley Earl, a famous automotive designer. Pen companies often contracted with designers to come up with innovative and current designs to attract buyers.”

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C/F pens were produced by Waterman, starting in about 1953 and until Waterman shut down its US operations.  After that time, many of the C/F pens found today were made in France.  This set has a “Made in USA” imprint.  That, and the 2 cent stamp above place the set in the 1953 to 1958 period.

As you can see, the set came in an attractive box.

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The cloth pen holder lifts up to reveal space for eight cartridges.  Six were found in these slots.  Unfortunately, they have dried up.  As cartridges are no longer produced for these pens, the cartridges are valuable as they can be used again after being cleaned and filled with syringe.

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While on the subject of C/F cartridges, here is an advertisement, from my collection, showing the cartridge above being inserted in a pen.  It also shows the various levels and prices of C/F pens produced in 1955, the date of this advertisement.

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These pens are not highly sought after by collectors, though some French models command high prices due to their materials.  I find the design interesting and am glad to have added a US set to my collection.

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November 22, 2011 - Posted by | Waterman C/F |

3 Comments »

  1. Neat find. I have a Waterman’s C/C that says “Flexible” on the barrel in chalk marks, but I have no cartridge to use in it. I believe it might be NOS. It’s interesting though that the nib doesn’t seem flexible at all, contrary to the chalk marks.

    Comment by ThirdeYe | November 22, 2011 | Reply

  2. Hi, I recently bought a waterman Goutte pen in flea market, which came without converter/ cart. Unfortunately its a slim pen accepting only C/F carts. I wonder whether you are willing to spare or sell one of these carts. Please mail me to harikmail@gmail.com

    Comment by harikharan | August 4, 2014 | Reply

  3. Any interest in a C/F cover art advertisement?

    Comment by Brandon | September 5, 2015 | Reply


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